Thursday, October 30th, 2014

British Open Betting

Known as The Open Championship or simply the Open in the United Kingdom, the British Open is the third major of the professional golf year. The British Open rotates among nine golf courses in England and Scotland, and is hosted by The R&A, which governs golf outside of the United States and Mexico. The British Open is the oldest of golf’s four majors, and the only major held outside the US. Unlike the other three majors, The British Open settles ties with a four-hole playoff.

The British Open always features a field of 156 top golfers drawn from the PGA Tour, the European PGA Tour, and qualifiers. About two-thirds of the field receives automatic exemptions, including top players in the World rankings, all past British Open champions who are 60 years old or younger, and recent champions of the other majors. The rest of the field comes from “Local Qualifying” and “International Qualifying.” Local qualifying comprises two rounds of tournaments around Britain and Ireland that begin a week and a half before the British Open. Since 2004, the R&A has held 36 spots for International Qualifying, which is open to only players who have a rating in the Official World Golf Rankings. International Qualifying consists of five 36-hole qualifying events held in Africa, Australasia, Asia, America and Europe.

2011 British Open Betting

The British Open is one of the most popular majors with fans and gamblers. Futures bets are available almost year-round, and specials and prop bets are popular right before the tournament.

Best Online Sportsbooks for British Open Betting

Sportsbook.com is usually one of the first to publish odds and prop bets for the British Open. They accept US players and they offer a nice $250 bonus when you make your first deposit.

Bookmaker.com is one of the most trusted brands in betting and they are offering betting odds for both the outright winner of the 2011 British Open and head to head matches.

Bet365 is the best option for European punters looking to bet on the 2011 British Open. They are offering a nice $100 bonus for new players and they will also have live odds available for the British Open.

British Open History
The first British Open was played in October 1860 at Prestwick Golf Club in Ayrshire, Scotland. Eight Scottish golfers played a 12-hole course three times in a single day, with Willie Park Senior winning the first title. There was no prize money in the first three Opens and winners received a red leather Champion’s Belt until 1870. From 1871 to the present, winners receive The Golf Champions Trophy, now better known as The Claret Jug. The Open expanded to 72 holes in 1892, and was held outside of Scotland for the first time in 1894 at Royal St George’s Golf Club in Sandwich, England.

The British Open is traditionally held every fifth year at the Old Course at St Andrews, hailed as the world’s oldest and most famous stretch of golfing land. The Open was first played at St Andrews in 1873. In 2011, the Open goes back to Royal St George; then in 2012, to Royal Lytham & St Annes in Northwest England, site of the 1926 Open. In 2013, the British Open will be played in Muirfield, Scotland, which hosted its first Open in 1892 just nine months after its construction. In 2014, England’s Royal Liverpool hosts for the twelfth time since 1897. Other courses in the rotation include Scotland’s Carnoustie Golf Links (first hosted an Open in 1931), The Turnberry Resort (1977) on the southwest coast of Scotland, Royal Troon in southwestern Scotland (1923), and Royal Birkdale in Northwest England (1954).

British Open Winners

HarryVardon holds the record for most British Open titles, winning six times between 1896 and 1914. James Braid (1901-1910), John Henry Taylor (1894-1913), Peter Thomson (1954-1965), and Tom Watson (1975-1983) won five times. The lowest 72-hole score in British Open history was Greg Norman’s 267 in 1993. The lowest 72-hole score in relation to par was Tiger Woods winning at -19 in 2000 (a record for all majors).

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