Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

PGA Championship Betting

The PGA Championship

The PGA Championship is the fourth and final major of the professional golf season, gaining it the nickname “Glory’s Last Shot.” It’s hosted by the PGA of America in mid-August, usually four weeks after the British Open, and rotates among some of the best golf courses in the United States.

Like the US Open and British Open, the PGA Championship has a field of 156 top players. Unlike the other majors, the PGA Championship reserves spots in its field for the top 20 finishers in the club professional championship, which is held in June. The PGA of America has been a separate entity from the PGA Tour since 1968, and it focuses on club pros and teachers, while the Tour focuses on elite touring professionals. The rest of the field usually comes from all former PGA champions, winners of the other three majors from the past five years, the reigning Senior PGA Champion, the top 15 finishers from the previous PGA Championship, the top 70 leaders in the PGA Tour money standings, and members of the most recent US Ryder Cup team.

The PGA Championship arguably features the strongest field of any major or golf tournament – since 1994, it has featured more players in the Top 100 of the Official World Golf Rankings than any other major.

2011 PGA Championship Betting

Like the other majors, the PGA Championship is extremely popular with fans and bookmakers. Futures bets on the PGA Championship are available year-round, and specials and prop bets abound in the weeks leading up to the tournament.

Best Online Sportsbooks for Betting the PGA Championship

There are plenty of online sportsbooks who are offering extra good odds and promotions during the PGA Championship due to the fact that it is one of the four golf majors. When it comes to betting on golf we have three sportsbooks that we always use. We have accounts at all three places and always keep all three accounts funded to ensure we are getting the best odds when betting on the PGA Championship.

Sportsbook.com – Our personal favorite when it comes to PGA Championship betting. They are not only offering the best odds and the most betting markets but they also accept US players and they give you a $250 free bonus when making your first deposit.

Bookmaker.com – These guys have been around forever and they are one of the few sportsbooks that never stopped accepting players from the US. They have great odds for the PGA Championship.

Bet365.com – If it wasn’t for the fact that Bet365 are unable to accept US customers this would be our first choice all day long. It’s a great option for European punters looking to place some bets on the PGA Championship. Should you miss the start of the bet you were planning to place that will not be a problem at Bet365.com as they are offering a great in-play betting platform where the odds are updated constantly.

PGA Championship History

In February 1916, the Professional Golfers Association was founded in New York. Later that year, the first PGA Championship was held at Siwanoy Country Club in Eastchester, New York. Britain’s Jim Barnes won the final match, as well as the $500 top prize and a diamond-studded gold medal. The tournament remained a match-play competition until 1958, with no tournaments held in 1917, 1918 and 1944 due to the two World Wars.

The PGA Championship has been held in 25 of the 50 United States. It will be held at Whistling Straits in Wisconsin in 2010, at Atlanta Athletic Club in Georgia in 2011, at Kiawah Island Golf Resort in South Carolina in 2012, at Oak Hill Country Club in New York in 2013, at Valhalla Golf Club in Kentucky in 2014, again at Whistling Straits in 2015, and at Baltusrol Golf Club in New Jersey in 2016.

PGA Championship Winners

Walter Hagan won five championships in the match-play era from 1921-1927, while Jack Nicklaus won five titles in the stroke play era from 1963-1980. Tiger Woods has won four titles from 1999-2007. The record for lowest overall 72-hole score at a PGA Championship belongs to David Toms, who shot 265 in 2001 (also the record low score for any major). Two men share the record for lowest 72-hole PGA Championship score in relation to par: Tiger Woods has twice won at -18, first in 2000 when he needed a playoff to beat Bob May who also was at -18 after four rounds, and then again in 2006. Winners have come from outside the United States only 12 times in the entire history of the PGA Championship, but South Korea’s Y.E. Yang won in 2009 and Ireland’s Padraig Harrington won in 2008.

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